How do you feel that slavery shaped work and working-class life in America? What do you feel were the most important aspects of workers becoming more urbanized in the nineteenth-century?

How do you feel that slavery shaped work and working-class life in America? What do you feel were the most important aspects of workers becoming more urbanized in the nineteenth-century?

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Respond to the following questions.

How do you feel that slavery shaped work and working-class life in America?
What do you feel were the most important aspects of workers becoming more urbanized in the nineteenth-century?
Please post a response, and remember to respond to two other people’s postings.

Click here to review the discussion rubric, which will be used in evaluating your discussion posts.

Image at right: Strong’s dime caricatures. No. 3, South Carolina Topsey in a fix. Here Topsy, the impish slave child in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” personifies the secessionist state South Carolina. 1 print : wood engraving with letterpress, by T.W. Strong, 1861. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Your readings this week include chapters 3-6 from the Dulles / Dubofsky book, chapters 6 -8 of Stansell, pp 25-66 of Rees / Pollack, and Rosanne Currarino’s “Meat vs. Rice.” The link to this article is in the module overview and in the class schedule.Currarino, “Meat vs. Rice: Working-Class Manhood and Anti-Chinese Hysteria”

The following are some quality web-based resources that you may be interested in viewing and incorporating into your written assignments or the discussion area (don’t forget to cite any materials you use):

Articles:

Blewett, Mary. Society and Economic Change. Journal of the Early Republic 12.4 (1992): 450-454.
Foner, Eric. Rights and the Constitution in Black Life during the Civil War and Reconstruction. The Journal of American History 74.3. (1987): 863-883.
Foner, Eric. The Meaning of Freedom in the Age of Emancipation. The Journal of American History 81:2. (1994): 435-460.
Genovese, Eugene D. and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. The Slave Economies in Political Perspective. The Journal of American History 66.1 (1979): 7-23.
Genovese, Eugene D. The Significance of the Slave Plantation for Southern Economic Development. The Journal of Southern History 28.4 (1962): 422-437.
Luff, Jennifer. Railway Spotters and the Origins of Workplace Surveillance. Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, vol 5, no 1 (Spring 2008), 47-74.
Montgomery, David. Strikes in Nineteenth-Century America. Social Science History 4.1 (1980):81-104.

Roediger, David R. The Pursuit of Whiteness: Property, Terror, and Expansion, 1790-1860. Journal of the Early Republic 19.4 (1999): 579-600.
Stansell, Christine. Women, Children, and the Uses of the Streets: Class and Gender Conflict in New York City, 1850-1860. Feminist Studies 8.2 (1982): 309-335.
Street, Richard Steven. Tattered Shirts and Ragged Pants: Accommodation, Protest, and the Coarse Culture of California Wheat Harvesters and Threshers, 1866-1900.The Pacific Historical Review 67.4 (1998): 573-608.
Upham-Borstein. Men of Families. Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, vol 4, no 1 (Spring 2007), 9-16.

Interactive Website:

PBS, Reconstruction: The Second Civil War.
Library of Congress, Rise of Industrial America 1876-1900: Work in the 19th Century.
Books:

Dubin, Tom. Transforming Women’s Work : New England Lives in the Industrial Revolution. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994.
Gutman, Herbert. Work, Culture, and Society in Industrializing America : Essays in American Working-class and Social History. New York: Knopf, 1976.
Keyssar, Alexander. Out of Work : the First Century of Unemployment in Massachusetts. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986.
Montgomery, David. The Fall of the House of Labor: the Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865-1925. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987
White, Deborah G. Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South. New York: Norton, 1995.
Wilentz, Sean. Chants Democratic: New York City and the Rise of the American Working Class, 1788-1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.

use these references as the main 1. Labor In America A History by Melvyn Dubofsky and Foster Rhea Dulles 2. City Of Women By Christine Stancell 3.Stayim Alive by Jefferson Cowie 4 The Voice of the People by Johathan Rees and Johnathan Pollack Your readings this week include chapters 3-6 from the Dulles / Dubofsky book, chapters 6 -8 of Stansell, pp 25-66 of Rees / Pollack, and Rosanne Currarino’s “Meat vs. Rice.” The link to this article is in the module overview and in the class schedule.Currarino, “Meat vs. Rice: Working-Class Manhood and Anti-Chinese Hysteria”

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